Click here to download

Job Demands, Job Resources and burnout in Health Emergency: an inquiry on Health Emergency Services workers
Journal Title: PSICOLOGIA DELLA SALUTE 
Author/s: Stefano Taddei, Cenerini Marco Vieri, Duccio Vanni 
Year:  2010 Issue: Language: Italian 
Pages:  16 Pg. 43-58 FullText PDF:  554 KB
DOI:  10.3280/PDS2010-002004
(DOI is like a bar code for intellectual property: to have more infomation:  clicca qui   and here 


The inquiry examines some aspects of Public Service for Health Emergencies of Italy (118) using the Job Demands-Job Resources (JD-JR) Model from Conservation of Resources (COR) theory. In literature particular attention is done to relation between burnout, JD and JR where emotional exhaustion is connected with JD and depersonalization with JR. The aims are: a) to check the role of organizational dimension of 118 service for burnout, JD and JR; b) to check if job overload could be predictive of burnout and c) to verify what JDJR variables could be predictive factors of burnout. The sample included 130 operators, splitted in two groups with high and low request. The analysis involves measures of resilience (CD-RISC), stress and burnout (OCS-MBI) and demographic information. Findings include relative high score in resilience for both groups and worst job condition for high request group. Burnout levels seems to be related to the environmental complexity and number of intervention. Job overload is a predictive variables for emotional exhaustion and depersonalization; resilience has a role only for personal accomplishment.
Keywords: Burnout, Resilience, Job Demands-Job Resources Model, Health Emergencies Public Services

Stefano Taddei, Cenerini Marco Vieri, Duccio Vanni, Job Demands, Job Resources and burnout in Health Emergency: an inquiry on Health Emergency Services workers in "PSICOLOGIA DELLA SALUTE" 2/2010, pp. 43-58, DOI:10.3280/PDS2010-002004

   

FrancoAngeli is a member of Publishers International Linking Association a not for profit orgasnization wich runs the CrossRef service, enabing links to and from online scholarly content