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Rethinking funding priorities in mental health research
Journal Title: PSICOTERAPIA E SCIENZE UMANE 
Author/s: Roberto Lewis-Fernández, Mary Jane Rotheram-Borus, Virginia Trotter Betts, Lisa Greenman, Susan M. Essock, Javier I. Escobar, Deanna Barch, Michael F. Hogan, Patricia A. Areàn, Benjamin G. Druss, Ralph J. DiClemente, Thomas H. McGlashan, Dilip V. Jeste, Enola K. Proctor, Pedro Ruiz, A. John Rush, Glorisa J. Canino, Carl C. Bell, Renata Henry, Portia Iversen 
Year:  2017 Issue: Language: Italian 
Pages:  6 Pg. 119-124 FullText PDF:  37 KB
DOI:  10.3280/PU2017-001007
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Mental health research funding priorities in high-income countries must balance longer-term investment in identifying neurobiological mechanisms of disease with shorter-term funding of novel prevention and treatment strategies to alleviate the current burden of mental illness. Prioritizing one area of science over others risks reduced returns on the entire scientific portfolio. (This article is an editorial that appeared in issue no. 6/2016 of The British Journal of Psychiatry, and in this Italian translation it is followed by three discussions, respectively by Giovanni de Girolamo, Andrea Fagiolini, and Giacomo Rizzolatti).
Keywords: Investments in mental health research; Scientific research; Balance in investment areas; Neurosciences; Applied research

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Roberto Lewis-Fernández, Mary Jane Rotheram-Borus, Virginia Trotter Betts, Lisa Greenman, Susan M. Essock, Javier I. Escobar, Deanna Barch, Michael F. Hogan, Patricia A. Areàn, Benjamin G. Druss, Ralph J. DiClemente, Thomas H. McGlashan, Dilip V. Jeste, Enola K. Proctor, Pedro Ruiz, A. John Rush, Glorisa J. Canino, Carl C. Bell, Renata Henry, Portia Iversen, Rethinking funding priorities in mental health research in "PSICOTERAPIA E SCIENZE UMANE" 1/2017, pp. 119-124, DOI:10.3280/PU2017-001007

   

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